Designer | Writer

Reliability Engineering App

 — A case study

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Reliability Engineering goes mobile

This is what happens when an Enterprise database and a familiar mobile operating system get their act together and take their show on the road.

This project is one of several apps an internal team is building in the hopes of enticing clients to explore mobile at the Enterprise level. I was dropped in mid-stream with loose parameters and looser direction (which turned out to be less of a trial-by-fire than I expected).

I started with a short brainstorming session with one of our UX Leads, based on a hastily-prepared Axure prototype the team had given us, and notes from previous conversations of which I was not a part. We talked through what they'd given us, how to interpret it, and a few possible interfaces. I was also able to draw on my own experience working in the field working for an acoustical engineering firm to include some user perspective.

While I was learning Axure, I did some pencil sketching to solidify some ideas and give myself a framework to build from. I reviewed it with our UX Leads, and made a few adjustments, but overall it seemed like a fairly solid plan.

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My first iteration wire-frames were very wire-framey. They captured a lot of what they were looking for, content-wise, but didn't have enough look and feel of the operating system for their taste. It also was missing some of the interactive features of the OS that they were hoping to incorporate.

After a client review and some feedback, I consulted with one of our Senior UX designers who specializes in this OS, then went back to the drawing board.

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Most of the changes were aesthetic and included adding a persistent header, showing interactive features like swipe and barcode scanning, and updating the wireframes to more closely align with the typical system UI.

I added a few additional screens of possible states, and built out a few extra screens that they had expressed confusion or concern about, or that they wanted to include.

The end result was a static digital prototype that gave the visual designers and app developers enough to get started. There may be one or two more additions, in the near term, but overall the team was happy with what was presented, and thought it captured their ideas well.

Reliability Engineering Mobile Application
Password: REPrototype12